Let’s get this straight… We cram a protein from one object into the seed of another object forcing a genetic mutation so that food can grow in a way that some Corporate Executive has deemed “more profitable.” Then, when we eat a bunch of this mutated “food” and our bodies start getting all funky we act clueless. Isn’t it time to open our eyes and realize the ingesting mutated cells can create mutated cells? Hello… we are made of cells, not steel. We live, we breath, we morph.
When we consume GMO foods, we are ingesting a food that was inserted with a gene that caused massive mutations in the plant’s DNA. That same gene may transfer to our cells…
Alessandra Gil explains it best. Read on >>    
Label-GMOs
You know how sometimes you make photocopies of a document and mark the original just so you remember which it is? Well if you were the American Medical Association and that document was our food, you’d say “Who Cares?” Here’s how self-contradicting the AMA is: In its statement, the AMA’s Dr. Patrice Harris said that their position recognizes that currently there is no evidence of materials differences or safety concerns in available bioengineered foods. See how she slipped in “currently?” Yeah, me too, and it makes me think Keep Reading »
No GMO - Paula Patrice
The United States grows more varieties of GM crops than any other country, including maize, soybeans, cotton, canola, sugarbeet, alfalfa, papaya and squash. Global area planted with biotech crops increased by 10 percent last year to reach 148m hectares, making it the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture, according to a new analysis. The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications (ISAAA), a non-profit organization which promotes the adoption of biotech crops, said in its new report that the United States still uses more genetically modified (GM) seeds than any other country, but Brazil had the largest increase for the second year running, with area planted to biotech crops rising 19 percent in 2010. Commercial planting of GM crops began in 1996, with 1.7m hectares planted that year, and over 15 years of cultivation, the total area devoted to GM crops increased 87-fold, to reach 148m hectares in 2010. ISAAA said that adoption rates in developing nations exceeded those in industrialized countries last year and it expects the trend to continue…. Click to read the entire article.